The Impact of Dry Eye on Vision-Related Quality of Life and Evidence-Based Treatment Options

Title:

The Impact of Dry Eye on Vision-Related Quality of Life and Evidence-Based Treatment Options

Topic: Ophthalmology
Relevant Terms: Diabetes And Dry Eye, Dry Eye Disease, Glaucoma, Sjogren's Syndrome
Primary Audience: Ophthalmologists
Launch Date: 17-Apr-14
Credits: AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
Expiration Date: The accreditation for this activity has expired.
Curriculum Name: The Impact of Dry Eye on Vision-Related Quality of Life and Evidence-Based Treatment Options

Learning Objectives

After completing this activity, the participant will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. RECOGNIZE the importance of early DED screening and treatment as it relates to visual functioning, productivity, and patient quality-of-life.
  2. IDENTIFY common symptoms of DED and comprehensive screening methods to diagnose DED.
  3. ASSESS various treatment strategies for optimizing ocular comfort and satisfaction in diverse patients.
  4. APPLY DED screening, diagnosis, and management plans in diverse patient cases.

    Faculty

    Esen K. Akpek, MD (Course Director)
    Professor of Ophthalmology and Rheumatology
    Director, Ocular Surface Disease and Dry Eye Clinic
    Associate Director, Johns Hopkins Jerome L. Greene Sjögren's Syndrome Center
    Director, Cornea and External Disease Fellowship
    The Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Anat Galor, MD, MSPH
    Assistant Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute
    University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
    Miami VAMC
    Miami, Florida
    Stephen C. Pflugfelder, MD
    Professor and Director of the Ocular Surface Center
    James and Margaret Elkins Chair
    Department of Ophthalmology
    Baylor College of Medicine
    Houston, Texas
    Presented by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
     
    OVERVIEW
    In the United States, dry eye disease (DED) is estimated to drastically affect the quality of life (QoL) for up to 20 million people. Symptoms of DED affect patients' productivity at work, leisure activities, social life, ability to drive safely, and overall visual function. Those who are most at risk for developing DED include patients who: have contact lenses, are older, are postmenopausal women, have diabetes and/or Sjögren's syndrome, who are taking medications known to cause drying, who have glaucoma, or have undergone cataract or postrefractive surgeries. Early diagnosis and treatment of patients with symptoms of DED have been shown to slow down, halt, or even reverse disease progression, leading to preservation or improvement in patients' QoL. These interactive case modules are designed to help ophthalmologists recognize early symptoms of DED and related conditions, including Meibomian gland dysfunction, Sjögren's syndrome, and DED related to diabetes. Furthermore, these case scenarios will help treating physicians understand the importance of early screening and how to effectively devise treatment plans in multiple patient types to restore ocular comfort.
     
    GOAL
    To provide ophthalmologists with up-to-date information on the treatment and management of patients with dry eye disease and related conditions.

    CME INFORMATION
    Accreditation Statement — The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
     
    Credit Designation Statement — The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
     
    After reviewing this online activity, participants may receive a certificate by receiving a score of 70% or higher on the CME test and completing an evaluation. A certificate of participation will be available online immediately following successful completion of the activity.
     
    The estimated time to complete this activity: 60 minutes.

    DISCLOSURE POLICIES
    Full Disclosure Policy Affecting CME Activities
    As a provider approved by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), it is the policy of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Office of Continuing Medical Education (OCME) to require signed disclosure of the existence of financial relationships with industry from any individual in a position to control the content of a CME activity sponsored by OCME. Members of the Planning Committee are required to disclose all relationships regardless of their relevance to the content of the activity. Faculty are required to disclose only those relationships that are relevant to their specific presentation. The following relationships have been reported for this activity:
     
    Participating Faculty Disclosures
    Esen K. Akpek, MD, reports receiving grants/research support from Alcon, Inc, and Allergan, Inc; and reports serving as a consultant for Nicox.
     
    Stephen C. Pflugfelder, MD, reports receiving grants/research support and serving as a consultant for Allergan, Inc, Bausch & Lomb Incorporated, and GlaxoSmithKline.
     
    No other authors have indicated that they have any financial interests or relationships with a commercial entity whose products or services are relevant to the content of their presentation(s).
     
    Planner Disclosures
    Esen K. Akpek, MD, reports serving as a principal investigator for Alcon, Inc, and Allergan, Inc.
     
    No other planners have indicated that they have any financial interests or relationships with a commercial entity.
     
    Note: Grants to investigators at The Johns Hopkins University are negotiated and administered by the institution that receives the grants, typically through the Office of Research Administration. Individual investigators who participate in the sponsored project(s) are not directly compensated by the sponsor, but may receive salary or other support from the institution to support their effort on the project(s).
     
    Off-Label Product Discussion
    Dr Esen K Akpek—Cyclosporine ophthalmic and topical steroids (loteprednol ophthalmic).
    Dr Anat Galor—Estrogen and topical dehydroepiandrosterone for the treatment of patients with dry eye syndrome.
     
    No other faculty has indicated that he/she will reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products.
     
    DISCLAIMER
    The opinions and recommendations expressed by faculty and other experts whose input is included in this activity are their own. This activity is produced for educational purposes only. Use of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine name implies review of educational format, design, and approach. Please review the complete prescribing information of specific drugs or combinations of drugs, including indications, contraindications, warnings, and adverse effects before administering pharmacologic therapy to patients.
     
    INTERNET CME POLICY
    The Office of Continuing Medical Education (CME) at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is committed to protecting the privacy of its members and customers. Johns Hopkins University SOM CME maintains its Internet site as an information resource and service for physicians, other health professionals, and the public. Continuing Medical Education at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine will keep your personal and credit information confidential when you participate in a CME Internet based activity. Your information will never be given to anyone outside of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine's CME program. CME collects only the information necessary to provide you with the services that you request.
     
    CONFIDENTIALITY DISCLAIMER FOR CME ACTIVITY PARTICIPANT
    I certify that I am participating in this Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine activity for CME-accredited training and/or educational purposes.
     
    I understand that while I am participating in this capacity, I may be exposed to "protected health information," as that term is defined and used in Johns Hopkins policies and in the federal HIPAA privacy regulations (the "Privacy Regulations"). Protected health information is information about a person's health or treatment that identifies the person. I also understand that while I am participating in this capacity I will be treated as a temporary member of Johns Hopkins for purposes of the Privacy Regulations only.
     
    I pledge and agree to use and disclose any of this protected health information only for the training and/or educational purposes of my visit and to keep the information confidential.
     
    I understand that I may direct to the Johns Hopkins Privacy Officer any questions I have about my obligations under this Confidentiality Pledge or under any of the Hopkins policies and procedures and applicable laws and regulations related to confidentiality. The contact information is: Johns Hopkins Privacy Officer, telephone:  410-735-6509, e-mail: HIPAA@jhmi.edu.
     
    "The Office of Continuing Medical Education at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, as sponsor of this activity, has relayed information with the CME attendees/participants and certify that the visitor is here for training, education and/or observation purposes only."
     
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
     Office of Continuing Medical Education
     720 Rutland Avenue/ Turner 20
     Baltimore, Maryland 21205-2195
     Reviewed & Approved by: General Counsel, Johns Hopkins Medicine (4/1/09)
     

    COURSE VIEWING REQUIREMENTS
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    ACTIVITY
    Instructions
    The following is a module containing 4 interactive cases designed to help you gauge your basic knowledge of the topic and then direct you to areas you may need to focus on. The activity consists of an unaccredited pre-test, 4 interactive case studies, a CME post-test, and activity evaluation. All sections must be completed to receive CME credit. A certificate of participation will be available online immediately following successful completion of the activity.
     
    Pre-Test
     
    The Impact of Dry Eye on Vision-Related Quality of Life and Evidence-Based Treatment Options
    Anat Galor, MD, MSPH, and Stephen C. Pflugfelder, MD
     
    Post-Test
     
    Supported by an educational grant from Allergan, Inc.